Prolateral Consulting Ltd
Prolateral Consulting Ltd
Knowledgebase : dns-engine
   

Problem:

Do I have to transfer my domain to Prolateral to use the Primary DNS?

Solution:

No, you do not have to transfer your domain to Prolateral to use the Master DNS service.

To use the Master DNS services you need to update the nameserver information (also known as glue records) with your current domain registrar to use the Prolateral DNS name servers.

Please use the following records when updating the nameserver information.

ns1.dns-engine.com
ns2.dns-engine.com
ns3.dns-engine.com
ns4.dns-engine.com
ns5.dns-engine.com

Remember to also add the dns-engine.com name servers as NS records to your domain.

Once this information has been updated then the Prolateral DNS-Engine DNS servers will start answering domain name queries for your domain.

 

Problem:

Do I have to transfer my domain to Prolateral to use the Secondary DNS or Backup DNS?

Solution:

No, you do not have to transfer your domain to Prolateral to use the Secondary DNS (Backup DNS) service.

To use the Secondary DNS (Backup DNS) service you need enter a valid source server IP Address and also ensure that server has been given permission to allow zone transfer to the following servers

ns1.dns-engine.com
ns2.dns-engine.com
ns3.dns-engine.com
ns4.dns-engine.com
ns5.dns-engine.com

If you want the DNS-Engine name servers to answer DNS queries you will need to add them as NS servers in your domain information.

If you want the DNS-Engine name servers to purely act as a backup service and not answer domain name queries then you can omit these servers from the NS information.

 

Problem:

How do I add DNS-Engine name servers to my domain?

Solution:

This example shows you how to add name server records to you domain using Prolateral’s Master DNS service.

  1. Log into the portal (http://portal.prolateral.com)
  2. Select the “DNS” TAB

  3. Domain Name Service Tab

  4. Select the “Primary DNS” TAB

  5. Primary DNS Service Tab

  6. Find the desired domain and select “Edit Records”.

  7. Edit zone records for domain name

  8. Select “Add Record” to add a row
  9. In the new row add the following
    Hostname = @
    Type = NS
    Server Address = ns1.dns-engine.com.

  10. Add the DNS-Engine Domain Name Servers as NS Records

  11. Repeat Step 6 for all DNS-Engine servers
    ns1.dns-engine.com.
    ns2.dns-engine.com.
    ns3.dns-engine.com.
    ns4.dns-engine.com.
    ns5.dns-engine.com.

 

This example shows you the extract of a zone file.

@    IN   NS   ns1.dns-engine.com.
@    IN   NS   ns2.dns-engine.com.
@    IN   NS   ns3.dns-engine.com.
@    IN   NS   ns4.dns-engine.com.
@    IN   NS   ns5.dns-engine.com.

Note: Please remember to add the “.” on the end of the name.

Problem:

How do I backup or download my zone files?

Solution:

In this article it is assumed that you have already setup your dns zone using the portal. In addition you know your public IP address of the workstation you are currently using.

In the portal you will need to add your public IP address to the Allow Transfer list for your domain.

Once complete you can transfer your zone file and back it up using an application like named-xfer

named-xfer -z example.com -f example.com.txt ns1.dns-engine.com

named-xfer comes with most unix distributions, however on Windows you use the ISC standard named-xfer tool.

 

 

Problem:

How do I change the source server for Secondary DNS?
How do I change the source server for Backup DNS?

Solution:

Both Secondary DNS and Backup DNS get there information from a specified source server.  The Source Server doesn’t have to be a Master Server or even an authoritative name server however the source server will need to allow zone transfers.

The source server must allow zone transfers to the following servers.

ns1.dns-engine.com
ns2.dns-engine.com
ns3.dns-engine.com
ns4.dns-engine.com
ns5.dns-engine.com

To change the source server on your Secondary DNS or Backup DNS follow the below procedure

  1. Log into the portal (http://portal.prolateral.com)
  2. Select the “DNS” TAB

  3. Domain Name Service Tab

  4. Select the “Secondary DNS” TAB

  5. Secondary DNS Service Tab

  6. Find the desired domain and select “Edit”.

  7. List of Secondary Domains

  8. Enter the valid IP Address of the source server and select “Save”

  9. Edit the Source Server for Secondary DNS

 

 

Problem:

I set up an MX record and my mail doesn't work, why?

Solution:

The most common mistake is to set up an MX record, without setting up an IP address for the mail host.

For example you create a MX record called mail.example.com for the domain example.com but mail.example.com has no IP address

It's important to create an address record for mail.example.com aswell.

Note this record must be a A record and not a CNAME to another record.

Problem:

What is a "AAAA" record?

Solution:

An AAAA record (or quad-A record) represents an IPv6 address. The format for an AAAA record is very similar to an A record.

  • Name - The host name of the record (e.g. www)
  • TTL - The time of live, if not specified the default for the zone will be used
  • IPv6 Address - Indicates the IPv6 address which this record is mapped to.

IPv6 addresses use eight groups of four hexidecimal digits, separated by colons.

For example: 2001:0db8:85a3:0000:0000:8a2e:0370:7334

 

Problem:

What is a "NS" record?

Solution:

A Name Server Record, or NS Record, indicates which name servers are authoritative for the zone.

E.g ns1.example.com and ns2.example.com

In this example both ns1 and ns2 would also need A records.

NS Records can also be used to assign authoritative name servers for a subdomain.  

 

Problem:

What is an "A" record?

Solution:

An "A" record, also called an "address" record, links a human readable name (e.g. www.example.com) to a computer IP address.

There are three values that must be specified for an A record:

  • Name - The host name of the record (e.g. www)
  • TTL - The time of live, if not specified the default for the zone will be used
  • IP - Indicates the IP which this record is mapped to. For example, 192.168.0.1

DNS-Engine supports multiple IPs per host name for routing and round robin.

 

Problem:

What is an "CNAME" record?

Solution:

"CNAME" records, short for "Canonical Name", create an alias from one domain name to another.

Note a CNAME record will not work everywhere. If you create an MX record, you must create an A record to that address and not use a CNAME

Problem:

What is an "MX" record?

Solution:

"MX" ("Mail eXchanger") records are used to specify what server on the Internet is running e-mail software that is configured to handle e-mail for your domain.

If you are using proFilter then you need to create the following MX records

MX     10     smtp.profilter.co.uk
MX     20     relay.profilter.co.uk

If you are using your own mail server remember to create the matching A record for that server and not a CNAME.

 

Problem:

What is an "SPF" record?

Solution:

A Sender Policy Framework record, or SPF Record, is used to control forged email. It does this by asking the sending domain if it matches the IP address of the person sending the email.

Below is an example to give you an idea of how SPF works.

Craig owns the domain example.com. He also sometimes sends mail through his GMail account and contacted GMail's support to identify the correct SPF record for GMail. Since he often receives bounces about messages he didn't send, he decides to publish an SPF record in order to reduce the abuse of his domain.

He adds the following record to his DNS domain zone file

example.com. TXT "v=spf1 a:mymailserver.example.com include:aspmx.googlemail.com -all"

The breakdown of that record is as follows

v=spf1 SPF version 1
mx the incoming mail servers (MXes) of the domain are authorised to also send mail for example.com
a:mymailserver.example.com the machine mymailserver.example.com is authorised
include:aspmx.googlemail.com everything considered legitimate by googlemail.com is legitimate for example.com
-all all other machines are not authorized

Problem:

What is an "TXT" record?

Solution:

Text records are simply a list of strings, each less than 256 characters in length.

Most common use of a TXT record is in a SPF record

Problem:

What is Round Robin DNS?

Solution:

Load balancing as known as Round Robin allows you to distribute your server load evenly among multiple servers.

This is done by creating multiple A records with the same name but different IP values.

For example:

NameTTLTypeIP
www
1800
A
192.168.0.1
www
1800
A
192.168.100.1

In this example 50% of the time a user would go to 192.168.0.1 and 50% of the time the user would go to 192.168.100.1.

You can split the traffic between as many as 10 hosts, and server load would be distributed evenly.